Missouri Republicans to Vote on Overriding Governor’s Veto of Forced Waiting Period Legislation

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News Abortion

Missouri Republicans to Vote on Overriding Governor’s Veto of Forced Waiting Period Legislation

Teddy Wilson

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon (D) vetoed a bill that would have forced women in the state to wait 72 hours before they could receive abortion care, but Republicans in the state legislature plan to hold a vote to override the governor’s veto.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon (D) vetoed a bill that would have forced women in the state to wait 72 hours before they could receive abortion care, but Republicans in the state legislature plan to hold a vote to override the governor’s veto.

The Missouri legislature meets Wednesday for consideration of overriding vetoes by the governor.

Nixon had vetoed the measure earlier this summer, citing that the legislation did not include exceptions for victims of rape or incest. The legislation would make Missouri only the third state with a 72-hour waiting period, joining Utah and South Dakota.

“Lengthening the already extensive waiting period serves no demonstrable purpose other than to create emotional and financial hardships for women who have undoubtedly already spent considerable time wrestling with perhaps the most difficult decision they may ever have to make,” Nixon said in a statement following the veto.

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The legislation, HB 1307, would also require the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services to create a video that contains all of the information that must be provided to a woman considering an abortion by the physician who is to perform or induce the abortion.

Increasing the waiting period is among Missouri Republicans’ top legislative priorities, and it appears that they may be able to accomplish their goal.

Rep. Kevin Elmer (R-Nixa), the sponsor of bill, told the Springfield News-Leader that it is looking increasingly likely that there will be enough votes to override the Nixon’s veto.

In order to override the veto, the legislation must be approved by a two-thirds vote in both chambers of the legislature—109 votes in the house and 23 votes in the senate. The bill was originally passed with 111 votes in the house, but just 22 in the senate.

The 72-hour waiting period is just one of a number of measures that have been introduced by Missouri lawmakers during the most recent legislative session. There is only one clinic that provides abortion care in the state, and many of the anti-choice measures directly target the last clinic.